Vasectomy No-Scalpel

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Vasectomy is a highly effective method of permanent birth control.  A vasectomy is a procedure performed on men that prevents sperm from going to the penis, so the ejaculate never has any sperm in it that can fertilize an egg.  

Vasectomy is done as an outpatient procedure. After the procedure is performed, it takes several months for the sperm count to drop to zero, so during that time another form of birth control should be used.

Men who have had a vasectomy are NOT at higher risk for heart disease, prostate cancer, testicular cancer or other health problems.

We offer vasectomies in our Bala Cynwyd, East Norriton, Lansdale and Philadelphia offices.

Effectiveness of No-Scalpel Vasectomy

No-scalpel vasectomy is 99.85 percent effective, with most failures occurring in the first few months when the semen may still contain sperm.

How it’s done

A small clamp with pointed ends is used to make a small puncture hole through the skin on the side of the scrotum. We then feel for the vas deferens, the tube that delivers sperm from the testicles, and pull it through the hole. We remove a small section, seal the ends and put it back in place. This prevents sperm from going to the penis, so the ejaculate never has any sperm in it that can fertilize an egg and make a woman pregnant. No stitches are needed because the puncture holes are so small and the skin is not cut. 

Cost

Vasectomy is often covered by insurance. Affordable, fixed-cost fees will be provided upfront for men paying out-of-pocket.

Where it’s done

No-scalpel vasectomy is done as an outpatient under local anesthesia in our Bala Cynwyd, East Norriton, Lansdale and Philadelphia offices. The procedure takes about 10 minutes.

Recovery

Studies have shown that no-scalpel vasectomy results in less bleeding, swelling, pain and infection than traditional vasectomy. No stitches are needed to close the tiny opening, which heals quickly and leaves no scar. Most men are back to work in a day or two and able to resume sexual intercourse in about a week. You should not perform any heavy physical labor for at least two days. You should be able to resume sports and heavy lifting about two to three weeks after surgery.

It will take about three months for your sperm count to drop to zero, so another form of birth control should be used during that time. We will conduct tests to determine sperm count after the operation. Once your sperm count is zero, no other birth control method is necessary.

A vasectomy will not interfere with your sex drive, ability to have erections, sensation of orgasm or ability to ejaculate. You may have occasional mild aching in your testicles during sexual arousal for a few months after the surgery. Men who have had a vasectomy are not at higher risk for heart disease, prostate cancer, testicular cancer or other health problems.

Complications, while rare, can include:

  • Infection of the puncture site or scrotum
  • Congestive epididymitis, an inflammation of the coiled tube (epididymis) that stores and carries sperm
  • Sperm granuloma, a small lump that forms at the puncture site
  • Recanalization, in which the ends of the vas deferens spontaneously grow back together